Thriving Professional Development Catalogue

A comprehensive curriculum has been planned throughout the 2020-2021 academic year that will establish a strong foundation for practitioners working in Canadian student affairs. The programme outcomes of the integrated professional development series are grounded in the core level of various CACUSS Professional Competencies and our divisional learning goals. 

 

September 2020

Plenary: Thriving at Western

Western HR Course Number: WSE1
Presenters: Dr. Laurie Schreiner & Dr. Jennifer Massey
Date: September 22, 2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Learning Goals: Future-Focused Educator; Global Learner; Community Builder

Session Outcomes:
  • Explain the factors of thriving and their role in supporting holistic student success;
  • Examine thriving as a framework for students’ academic, interpersonal and intrapersonal development;
  • Discuss how the thriving framework informs strategic vision and programme development across the Western Student Experience portfolio;
  • Recognize how the educators’ unique roles connect to the vision of a thriving campus;
  • Identify the network of options available on campus that can help students aspire or return to a state of thriving.

    The vision for Western Student Experience is centred on creating a thriving campus, where educators from across campus help maximize the academic, interpersonal and interpersonal development of each student (Schreiner, 2013). With a belief in leveraging students’ strengths to help them be successful, educators across the campus must collectively co-create transformational learning experiences, supports and interventions that inspire students to achieve their best (Schreiner, Louis & Nelson, 2012). This plenary will introduce educators to Dr. Laurie Schreiner’s thriving research and contextualize it on our Western campus.

The History of Student Affairs & the Canadian Landscape

Presenters: Dr. Tricia Seifert & Dr. Jennifer Massey
Date: September 30, 9:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.
Learning Goals: Critical Thinker; Global Learner; Community Builder

Session Outcomes:
  • Discuss the historical context of student affairs as a profession;
  • Examine the strengths and limitations of the Canadian student affairs landscape;
  • Identify the role of student affairs in institutional retention efforts and the holistic growth of students;
  • Explain how our campus is uniquely situated to evolve student affairs work and contribute to student success.

    Very few student affairs folks realize that working on campus within the co-curricular realm is actually a career until they have a transformative experience that opens their eyes to this incredible field. This foundational session highlights the evolving field of student affairs dating back to the 1970s, including the history, philosophy, values, and seminal works of the profession. Considering how student affairs contributes to the Canadian landscape of higher education, educators will better understand the values of our work and how we can be innovative in moving the profession forward.

October 2020

Coffee and Conversation: October [Optional]

Organizer: Kate Schieman
Date: RSVPs are due by October 1st; pairings will be sent out by October 6th.
Learning Goals: Community Builder; Future-Focused Educator

Session Outcomes:
  • Develop professional relationships with Western student affairs colleagues across various units and departments; Discuss individual accomplishments, future goals and professional interests;
  • Identify resources and development opportunities that align with their professional goals and interests.

    Each month, educators who RSVP but the deadline will be paired with another professional in the cohort to engage in a one-hour coffee and conversation. This learning experience is designed to provide an informal opportunity to develop relationships and collaborative connections with peers outside of their unit, and offer space to engage in dialogue about professional goals, next steps, and continuous development. Go for coffee (virtually and/or in-person) and get to know your colleagues in fun, relaxed way!

Becoming a Scholar-Practitioner: Informed Theory and Practice

Presenters: Dr. Neil Buddell & Sara Wills
Date: October 13, 10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Learning Goals: Future-focused Educator; Critical Thinker

Session Outcomes:
  • Identify best practices as a scholar-practitioner in student affairs;
  • Discuss best practice literature that informs our work within Western Student Experience;
  • Explain how student development theories can guide the design of programmes and supports that promote student well-being;
  • Examine the qualities of various student development theories in co-curricular learning;

    Becoming a scholar-practitioner requires student affairs educators to understand and be able to evaluate various student development theories that guide our work in student affairs. This session will focus on best practice literature that guides our field, research on thriving that informs our strategic plan, and critical questions about the merits and limitations of theories. Participants will also brainstorm ways to apply student development theories to their day-to-day work to support student well-being and the development of a thriving campus.

Book Club: Dare to Lead Launch [Optional]

Facilitators: Dr. Steph Hayne-Beatty, Dr. Kim Miller, Stephanie White & Kerri Arthurs
Date: October 20, 2:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m.
Learning Goals: Future-Focused Educator; Critical Thinker


Session Outcomes:
  • Discuss the format and communal learning experience of the Dare to Lead book club;
  • Identify monthly assigned chapters and reading deadlines;
  • Develop shared goals to guide a meaningful learning experience.

    Dare to Lead by Brene Brown has been described as a seminal read for courage-building in the workspace (Minors, 2018). Considering ways in which vulnerability can cultivate innovation and creativity, this book encourages leaders to own their fears, choose courage over comforts and our whole heart over armour, and build an organizational culture that is based in bravery and authenticity. Educators who participate will receive their own copy of the book (or audio-book) and reflection prompts to engage in this self-directed learning experience in meaningful way. Educators will participate in on-going discussions and activities based on the assigned chapters as well.

November 2020

Coffee and Conversation: November [Optional]

Organizer: Kate Schieman
Date: RSVPs are due by November 2; pairings will be sent out by November 5.
Learning Goals: Community Builder; Future-Focused Educator


Session Outcomes:
  • Develop professional relationships with Western student affairs colleagues across various units and departments;
  • Discuss individual accomplishments, future goals and professional interests;
  • Identify resources and development opportunities that align with their professional goals and interests.

    Each month, educators who RSVP but the deadline will be paired with another professional in the cohort to engage in a one-hour coffee and conversation. This learning experience is designed to provide an informal opportunity to developlopment relationships and collaborative connections with peers outside of their unit, and offer space to engage in dialogue about professional goals, next steps, and continuous deve. Go for coffee (virtually and/or in-person) and get to know your colleagues in fun, relaxed way!

Discovering Strengths in Self and Others

Presenters: Dr. Frank Shushok Jr. & Alex Elias
Date: November 5, 10:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m.
Learning Goals: Adaptable Problem Solver; Future-Focused Educator

Session Outcomes:
  • Identify their Top 5 Signature CliftonStrengths themes;
  • Examine how talents can influence their own successes and challenges as a leader;
  • Recognize ways in which leveraging unique talents can support continuous learning and self-development in their role;
  • Discuss strategies to embed a strengths-based approach into their work with students and contribute to a thriving campus.

    Understanding and leveraging individual strengths is a critical component of thriving. To help students discover and engage in their unique talents and be the best version of themselves, educators must also recognize and examine their own strengths as a leader. Through this session, educators will be able to identify their Top 5 Signature Themes and discuss ways they can leverage and use them in their own work to enhance professional success and continuous development. By understanding their own experience with and the language of strengths, educators can start to engage in meaningful dialogues with students about their own talents as well.

Book Club: Dare to Lead [For Educators enrolled in the Book Club]

Facilitators: Dr. Steph Hayne-Beatty, Dr. Kim Miller, Stephanie White & Kerri Arthurs
Date: November 17, 2:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m.
Learning Goals: Future-focused Educator; Community Builder

Session Outcomes:
  • Discuss personal and professional reflections about daring leadership; Recognize the value of vulnerability and authenticity in creating a thriving campus for students and colleagues;
  • Identify opportunities to embed the philosophy of daring leadership in their day-to-day work as an educator;
  • Use Dare to Lead as a framework to set meaningful personal and professional goals.

    Bringing together educators who are participating in the book club, this round-table discussion offers an opportunity to reflect on the assigned chapters of the book and engage in critical dialogue about what authentic and daring leadership means in our life and our work. Come prepared to share your reflections and ideas about how daring leadership can contribute to your goals as an educator and better serve our students and thriving campus community.

Demonstrating Student Learning: Outcomes & Assessment

Presenters: Dr. Jeff Burrow & Sara Wills
Date: November 26, 10:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m.
Learning Goal(s): Future-Focused Educator; Adaptable Problem-Solver

Session Outcomes:
  • Differentiate between assessment, evaluation and research in higher education;
  • Describe the various steps of the assessment cycle;
  • Write (or revise) meaningful and accessible learning outcomes informed by theoretical learning frameworks;
  • Select at least two assessment tools to effectively measure learning outcomes;
  • Create a project assessment plan for a programme within their respective portfolio;
  • Identify tools to appropriately evaluate programmes as quality assurance/quality improvement (QAQI) or research.

    While we hope that our students walk away with the objectives that we are teaching in our workshops, 1:1 conversations, activities and interventions, we actually don't know what they have learned if we do not engage in meaningful assessment. A key piece of implementing meaningful assessment is identifying learning outcomes – what students will know, do and value as a result of their learning experience – and assess these regularly to continuously enhance our programmes and supports. Not only does intentional assessment help us improve our programmes and share our students' stories, it helps us be better student affairs educators as well.

December 2020

Building Collaborative Partnerships & Leading Teams

Presenters: Dr. Nona Robinson & Erin Huner
Date: December 3, 1:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m.
Learning Goals: Future-focused Planner; Critical Thinker; Adaptable Problem Solver

Session Outcomes:
  • Identify essential skills and attitudes required for collaborative leadership grounded in evidence-informed research;
  • Recognize strategies that can contribute to an inclusive environment that energizes teams, releases creativity, and cultivates a culture that is both productive and joyful;
  • Discuss ways to seek out a diversity of ideas among teammates to build strategies and solve problems;
  • Examine opportunities within their respective role to inspire teammates to engage in new and different ways of work and interacting with others.

    Collaborative leadership aims to bring managers and staff together, both within their respective unit and within others. In collaborative workplaces, information is shared organically, and everyone takes responsibility for the whole. In contrast to traditional top-down organizational models where a small group of executives control the flow of information, by thinking about ways in which educators can develop and use a collective leadership approach in their work, we can begin to build more collaborative partnerships within and outside of our units, and infuse these practices into the way we lead our teams.

January 2021

Coffee and Conversation: January [Optional]

Organizer: Kate Schieman
Date: RSVPs are due by January 7; pairings will be sent out by January 11.

Learning Goals: Community Builder; Future-Focused Educator

Session Outcomes:
  • Develop professional relationships with Western student affairs colleagues across various units and departments;
  • Discuss individual accomplishments, future goals and professional interests;
  • Identify resources and development opportunities that align with their professional goals and interests.

    Each month, educators who RSVP but the deadline will be paired with another professional in the cohort to engage in a one-hour coffee and conversation. This learning experience is designed to provide an informal opportunity to develop relationships and collaborative connections with peers outside of their unit, and offer space to engage in dialogue about professional goals, next steps, and continuous development. Go for coffee (virtually and/or in-person) and get to know your colleagues in fun, relaxed way!

Leveraging Technology and Communication in Supporting Student Success

Western HR Course Number: WSE2
Presenters: Dr. Ed Cabellon & Lesley D’Souza
Date: January 19, 2:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m.
Learning Goals: Community Builder; Future-Focused Educator

Session Outcomes:
  • Identify appropriate technology tools to enhance communication with diverse groups of students and staff;
  • Articulate key messages effectively and professionally through various communication media;
  • Recognize engaging technological tools that can be easily integrated into programmes and supports to capture student learning;
  • Write concise and clear communications that engage students and offer timely information.

    Social media and virtual learning has quickly become an integrated part of our day-to-day life and can play a key part in student engagement. It is important that educators are at the forefront of technology as a learning and communication tool, as it allows opportunities for students to engage, collaborate, share ideas and receive information. This session will provide space for educators to think about ways they can thoughtfully leverage technology to enhance student engagement, collect data about student success, and share valuable information about their programmes to students and stakeholders.

Book Club: Dare to Lead [For Educators enrolled in the Book Club]

Facilitators: Dr. Steph Hayne-Beatty, Dr. Kim Miller, Stephanie White & Kerri Arthurs
Date: January 27, 2:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m.
Learning Goals: Adaptable Problem-Solver; Community Builder

Session Outcomes:
  • Discuss personal and professional reflections about daring leadership;
  • Recognize the value of vulnerability and authenticity in creating a thriving campus for students and colleagues;
  • Identify opportunities to embed the philosophy of daring leadership in their day-to-day work as an educator;
  • Use Dare to Lead as a framework to set meaningful personal and professional goals.

    Bringing together educators who are participating in the book club, this round-table discussion offers an opportunity to reflect on the assigned chapters of the book and engage in critical dialogue about what authentic and daring leadership means in our life and our work. Come prepared to share your reflections and ideas about how daring leadership can contribute to your goals as an educator and better serve our students and thriving campus community.

February 2021

Coffee and Conversation: February [Optional]

Organizer: Kate Schieman
Date: RSVPs are due by February 4; pairings will be sent out by February 9.

Learning Goals: Community Builder; Future-Focused Educator

Session Outcomes:
  • Develop professional relationships with Western student affairs colleagues across various units and departments;
  • Discuss individual accomplishments, future goals and professional interests;
  • Identify resources and development opportunities that align with their professional goals and interests.

    Each month, educators who RSVP but the deadline will be paired with another professional in the cohort to engage in a one-hour coffee and conversation. This learning experience is designed to provide an informal opportunity to develop relationships and collaborative connections with peers outside of their unit, and offer space to engage in dialogue about professional goals, next steps, and continuous development. Go for coffee (virtually and/or in-person) and get to know your colleagues in fun, relaxed way!

Working with and Supporting Diverse Student Populations

Western HR Course Number: WSE3
Presenters: Ladan Mowlid
Date: February 10, 2:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m.
Learning Goals: Critical Thinker, Global Learner

Session Outcomes:
  • Differentiate between practices of equity, diversity, inclusion and access;
  • Recognize culturally appropriate strategies for communication and relationship building skills with diverse students and colleagues;
  • Describe issues that impact people based on local, national, and global levels;
  • Examine their own cultural beliefs, assumptions and attitudes with respect to diverse student populations.

    Knowledge of equity, diversity, inclusion and access are essential to create learning environments that foster equitable participation for all groups and seek to address issues of power and privilege. This workshop is designed to help educators develop a sense of their own agency and social responsibility that includes others, the community and the larger global context. It also encourages educators to consider self-awareness, knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to support and build community within a diverse post-secondary setting.

Gender-based Violence on Post-Secondary Campuses & Western’s Framework for Prevention

Presenters: Danielle Carr
Date: February 24, 10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Learning Goals: Global Learner, Community Builder

Session Outcomes:
  • Discuss how Canadian post-secondary institutions are addressing sexual violence behaviour and a culture of sexual violence on their campuses;
  • Recognize the intersection of gender-based violence and equity in post-secondary prevention education;
  • Differentiate between sexual violence policy response and preventative education;
  • Identify campus and community resources that provide gender-based violence prevention and response support to students;
  • Explain how Western’s Gender-Based Violence Framework can be used to critically evaluate existing curricular programmes and guide the development of new learning experiences.

    Gender-based violence (GBV) is violence committed against an individual based on their perceived gender, gender expression or gender identity. As we work as a field to combat gender-based violence and better reshape how we think about it on our campuses, it is essential that educators are aware of GBV policies and preventative education to support the community climates where students live, work and study. At Western, we have made the decision to complement our prevention efforts with our sexual violence policy, while ensuring they are distinct, through the creation of the Gender-based Violence Framework. With that in mind, this session introduces the issue of gender-based violence and the impact it has on campus communities, as well as to the framework. It will explore our work through critical dialogue and encourage educators to examine existing programmes through a reflective, self-assessment lens, which seeks to answer two key questions: Who am I [as an educator] in the context of using this framework and the larger campus ecosystem? How does this framework apply to me?

March 2021

Coffee and Conversation: March [Optional]

Organizer: Kate Schieman
Date: RSVPs are due by March 4; pairings will be sent out by March 9.
Learning Goals: Community Builder; Future-Focused Educator

Session Outcomes:
  • Develop professional relationships with Western student affairs colleagues across various units and departments;
  • Discuss individual accomplishments, future goals and professional interests;
  • Identify resources and development opportunities that align with their professional goals and interests.

    Each month, educators who RSVP but the deadline will be paired with another professional in the cohort to engage in a one-hour coffee and conversation. This learning experience is designed to provide an informal opportunity to develop relationships and collaborative connections with peers outside of their unit, and offer space to engage in dialogue about professional goals, next steps, and continuous development. Go for coffee (virtually and/or in-person) and get to know your colleagues in fun, relaxed way!

Book Club: Dare to Lead [For Educators enrolled in the Book Club]

Facilitators: Dr. Steph Hayne-Beatty, Dr. Kim Miller, Stephanie White & Kerri Arthurs
Date: March 2, 2:00 p.m.-3:00 p.m.
Learning Goals: Adaptable Problem-Solver; Community Builder

Session Outcomes:
  • Discuss personal and professional reflections about daring leadership;
  • Recognize the value of vulnerability and authenticity in creating a thriving campus for students and colleagues;
  • Identify opportunities to embed the philosophy of daring leadership in their day-to-day work as an educator;
  • Use Dare to Lead as a framework to set meaningful personal and professional goals.

    Bringing together educators who are participating in the book club, this round-table discussion offers an opportunity to reflect on the assigned chapters of the book and engage in critical dialogue about what authentic and daring leadership means in our life and our work. Come prepared to share your reflections and ideas about how daring leadership can contribute to your goals as an educator and better serve our students and thriving campus community.

Using Universal Design for Learning Frameworks in Student Affairs

Presenters: Dr. Patti Dyjur & Dr. Wendy Dickinson
Date: March 11, 2:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m.
Learning Goals: Community Builder; Global Learner; Future-Focused Educator

Session Outcomes:
  • Identify the three main principles of universal design for learning;
  • Discuss inclusive practices that work to increase accessibility by reducing physical and cognitive barriers for students;
  • Explain how integrating universal design for learning principles into programmes and supports can build sustaining and evolving learning environments for all students;
  • Examine opportunities to infuse universal design for learning principles into their existing programmes and supports;
  • Create an action plan outlining steps to integrate universal design for learning principles into existing programmes and embed it in the design process for new programmes.

    Universal design for learning (UDL) is a way of thinking about teaching and learning that helps give all students an equal opportunity to succeed. Considering how this approach can be infused into our programmes and supports allows us to offer flexibility in the ways our students access material, engage with it, and demonstrate learning. This approach to learning also allows educators to think about different ways to engage students and keep them motivated. Come prepared to examine how UDL-friendly your existing programmes and supports are for students, and create an action plan to make them more accessible for the future.

Student Affairs Fireside Chat

Expert Speakers: Dr. Ivan Joseph, David McMurray, Dr. Janet Morrison, Dr. Jennifer Massey (Moderator)
Date: March 23, 10:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m.
Learning Goals: Critical Thinker; Future Focused Educator

Session Outcomes:
  • Discuss various trends and challenges that the field of student affairs may face over the next 5 years;
  • Identify at least one professional development opportunity they are committed to further exploring;
  • Examine the diverse educational and professional pathways of senior level student affairs professionals.

    As there is no one, direct path into student affairs, everyone has a unique educational and professional journey. Depending on the provincial landscape and institution type, the policies and standards that inform our work, and our own development as educators, can look very different. During this fire side chat, our group of experts will explore the various pathways into senior leadership positions, share recommended professional development opportunities, and discuss where they think the field of student affairs is headed in the next 5 years. Educators are encouraged to be curious, ask questions, and reflect on how this discussion may inform their future academic and professional development goals.

Book Club: Dare to Lead -- Reflection and Celebration [For Educators enrolled in the Book Club]

Facilitators: Steph Hayne-Beatty
Date: March 31, 2:00 p.m.-3:30 p.m.
Learning Goals: Adaptable Problem-Solver; Community Builder

Session Outcomes:
  • Discuss personal and professional reflections about daring leadership;
  • Recognize the value of vulnerability and authenticity in creating a thriving campus for students and colleagues;
  • Create an action plan to embed the philosophy of daring leadership in their day-to-day work as an educator;
  • Use Dare to Lead as a framework to set meaningful personal and professional goals.

    Bringing together educators who are participating in the book club, this wrap up event will provide a final opportunity to reflect on and share how daring leadership has changed how we think about our work as student affairs educators. Facilitated by Brené Brown herself, educators will have the opportunities to ask questions, learn more about the research behind her work, and consider strategies to apply the principles of daring leadership across personal and professional experiences.

April 2021

Capstone Presentation

Organizers: Sara Wills & Rosanna Stumpo-Bal
Date: Capstone presentations the weeks of April 27 – May 8, 2021
Learning Goal: Innovative Scholar-Practitioner

Session Outcomes:
  • Examine knowledge, skills and attitudes acquired throughout the professional development experience;
  • Select examples that demonstrate knowledge acquisition and skill development as a student affairs educator;
  • Explain how the different learning experiences have increased their understanding of the field of student affairs;
  • Design a culminating project that makes connections between their learning journey and their future goals as a scholar-practitioner.

The capstone project is the culmination of the integrated professional development plan, combining the knowledge, skills and perspectives educators have acquired. With an emphasis on creative reflection, this project makes connections between the educator’s learning journey and their goals for the future. Educators are encouraged to use the following prompts to help frame their capstone project and use the medium of their choice (ie. presentation, paintings, podcast, e/portfolio, etc.)

  • How has this experience shaped how you see yourself as a scholar-practitioner?
  • What strategies, ideas, concepts, and literature will you use moving forward to be a more intentional student affairs educator?
  • How will you implement practices related to social justice, decolonization and universal design into your role and programme development?
  • When did you see your strengths in action within this programme?
  • How has this programme helped you thrive as an educator? How has it helped you contribute more intentionally to a thriving campus?
  • What competencies would you like to continue developing in the future? What professional development goals do you have? What types of professional development opportunities exist that can help you in achieving that goal?
Upon submission and presentation of a high-quality capstone project, educators will receive formal recognition for their contributions to the programme and commitment to developing knowledge and skills as an innovative scholar-practitioner.